FNF Coaches Talk

Good afternoon, Coaches. Welcome back. We hope you enjoyed the weekend. Here are three stories for today.

1. 8 Ways to Improve Your On-Field Technology (FNF Coaches)

There are various ways to improve on-field technology, depending on a school’s operating budget and resources. We’ve picked out eight.

Here are two you may not have heard about.

Video technology
The camera technology has gotten so good that high school coaches are finding it within their budgets to afford products that remove the blur, and in some cases, don’t even require videographers to hold the camera. The DJI Osmo x5 is a handheld device that can be used while the videographer is in motion without blur. The HUDL Focus is a smart camera that follows the action and automatically records and uploads to HUDL.
Tackling systems
With concussion research at the forefront of the sport of football, coaches are limited to the number of full-pad practices they can hold each week. Companies like TackleTube, TackleBar and MVP Drive provide padded equipment or robots for players to use when practicing tackling technique. Research shows the decrease in live reps has also caused a decrease in head injuries.

What new on-field technology helped your team in 2018?

2. New Jersey high school football players mentor younger students (Burlington County Times)

The Red Zone peer mentoring program has partnered Burlington City High School football players with a group of Wilbur Watts Intermediate School boys to talk weekly about how to behave in school, academics and life in general.

For the high school football players, it was the power of being a role model and the impact their decisions can have on those who look up to them. For the intermediate students, it was how to be respectful, accountable and a better student.

Wilbur Watts school counselor Kryssa Calderone came up with the idea for the program when thinking about the school’s atmosphere on Fridays in the fall. Raymond Costello Field, home to the Burlington City High School football team, is essentially the intermediate school’s front yard.

“Our little boys watch practices and games, and Friday night lights turns into everybody getting ready for the football game,” Calderone said. One morning while she was getting ready for work it clicked, and she reached out to Burlington City Head Football Coach Ray Robinson.

What mentoring opportunities can you provide for your players next season?

3. Copycat NFL Teams Hunting for Rookie QBs Who Can Be the Next Taysom Hill (Bleacher Report)

It looks like the copycat NFL has finally figured out that backup quarterbacks can be much more than just backup quarterbacks. It’s all thanks to Taysom Hill, the former Brigham Young option quarterback who made slash players all over the field last year.

Hill slipped below the draft radar because his college career was interrupted by several injuries and his Mormon mission. The Saints grabbed Hill off waivers two years ago and transformed him into a unique multi-position playmaker.

Hill rushed for 196 yards and two touchdowns last year on Wildcat-type plays, fake punts and other chicanery. He caught three passes and completed three others. He returned kickoffs. He blocked a punt. He played on the punt and kick coverage units.

Buccaneers general manager Jason Licht even spoke about the appeal of a Hill-type player earlier in the offseason.
“If you can find a backup quarterback who can play on a lot of your special teams units and come in and play a role on offense, you’re utilizing 46 guys on your roster on game day,” he said, via Auman. “It’s something that’s talked about a lot. It’s finding a guy that’s the tough part.”

Hill’s success may have finally opened the eyes of coaches and GMs to the possibility of doing more with their third-string quarterbacks than inactivating them on Sundays. And that may open the door for other players with similar skill sets.

In what ways do you try to get your second- and third-string quarterbacks adjusted to the speed of the game?

 

About the author

Dan Guttenplan