FNF Coaches Talk

1. Offseason Football Training Workout Checklist (Muscle and Strength)

Very few high school football programs have the budget allotted for a full-time strength coach. So if you find yourself searching links for strength program guides or scouring the magazine isle in your local grocery store looking for the muscle magazine with the newest program to help you take your game to the next level come fall, this is worth a read.

After a thorough warmup, the workout put the focus on linear periodization.

However, you are a football player looking to make strength gains for on the field, and for this sort of endeavor, linear periodization has stood the test of time and forged some world class athletes.

Here are some tips players might like: No running on a treadmill and no runs of over 3 miles.

This next tip is becoming the norm in high school strength programs but it’s worth emphasizing.

So what movements should a good program consist of? The possibilities are endless, but there should be lots of hip hinges (deadlifts, RDL’s), squats (self-explanatory), loaded-carries (farmers walk, waiter carries), pushes (push-up, overhead press), pulls (pull-up, bent over row). Also, there should be some sort of explosive component programmed at some point in the program, such as cleans, snatches, high pulls, box jumps, etc..

It’s worth reading the whole article because a strength exercise does not work in a vacuum. This requires full buy-in.

Coaches — What is one tip you’d offer to a coach designing his own strength program?

2. Urban Meyer shares his tips to recruiting (Football Advantage)

It’s easy for your most talented players to get distracted by the recruiting process. Sometimes, they become disengaged from the high school team while they place more stock in their next step. Coach Meyer has a message that is likely music to the ears of high school coaches.

“You leave here, you thank the coaches that watched you and go back and bust your tail for your high school coach, your high school program and become a captain of that team.”

Here’s the longer version of the speech.

How do you keep your players focused on the importance of performing at the high school level while they’re being recruited by college coaches?

3. New study finds student-athletes need to wait at least a week to return to school after orthopaedic procedures (USA Today)

We’ve all coached athletes who have required orthopaedic procedures either in-season or during the offseason, and there’s a new study showing the ideal recovery time before the athletes returns to school.  These procedures could include procedures to a knee ligament, as well as hip and shoulder operations.

While the surgical procedures have definitely improved, the study found that, on average, a patient needed to wait a full week before returning to school.

We know what you’re thinking, Coaches. That seems faster than you thought, right? Well, not so fast.

That recommendation had nothing to do with when a student-athlete can return to competition, of course. That measure is far less certain and relies significant more on individual recovery. This study focused solely on when it was safe for them to return to classes without missing more instruction or suffering a physical setback.

So, this study suggests keeping the student out of school for a week. The return to the field will obviously take much longer.

What do you recommend in terms of recovery time to players who undergo orthopaedic procedures?

What’s driving the conversation in your locker room? Email Managing Editor Dan Guttenplan or Tweet us @fnfcoaches. Don’t forget to use that hashtag #FNFCoachesTalk!

About the author

Dan Guttenplan