FNF Coaches Talk

Happy Friday, Coaches. Here are some stories to take you into the weekend.

1. Never-seen-before: The Colts defense shows man and plays zone (ESPN)

The Indianapolis Colts offense has been getting plenty of credit this season under first-year head coach Frank Reich, but it’s the defense that earns the praise of ESPN analyst Dan Orlovsky. The film from this play is pretty amazing to watch. The Indy defense actually has defensive backs following pre-snap motion across the formation, only to settle into a zone after the ball is snapped.

The result of the play? An interception.

Coaches — How do you disguise your looks on defense without confusing your own players?

2. WATCH: Eastern Washington pulls off trick play TD in FCS title game (Yardbarker)

The Eastern Washington Eagles were down by two touchdowns against North Dakota State late in the second quarter of the FCS title game when they got bold on fourth-and-goal. Lined up for a field goal, the Eagles pulled off fake and crossed the plane of the end zone by the skin of their teeth.

What are you looking for on film when you’re trying to see if an opponent is susceptible to a fake punt or field goal?

3. Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association releases opinion piece telling overzealous parents to ‘cool it’ (WIAA)

We often ask high school coaches about the most difficult part of their jobs. The most common answer: parents.

It appears that coaches, administrators and league officials in Wisconsin agree with that sentiment.

WIAA director Dave Anderson, in conjunction with the National Federation of High School Associations, is circulating an op-ed titled “Dear Mom and Dad: Cool it” that focuses on parents’ verbal criticisms of officials at sporting events.

It seems that parents in Wisconsin are particularly hard on the referees, but we know coaches have to deal with much more from parents behind the scenes. If it’s that bad on game day, imagine what it’s like for coaches on the other six days of the week.

“Parents, not all, are a problem at almost every high school and youth athletic event that I attend,” Nicolet High School athletic director Kirk Krychowiak said. “The parents who cheer the right way and have the proper etiquette at games far outweigh the ones that don’t, but those that don’t tend to be the loudest and most difficult to deal with. I struggle with this as an administrator.”

How do you foster an environment in which parents respect the boundaries of the coaches?

What’s driving the conversation in your locker room? Email Managing Editor Dan Guttenplan or Tweet us @fnfcoaches. Don’t forget to use that hashtag #FNFCoachesTalk!

 

 

 

About the author

Dan Guttenplan