FNF Coaches Talk

TGIF, Coaches! Let’s check out some stories before the weekend.

1. Five ideas for high school football coaches to get more player buy-in (MaxPreps)

This is the time of year when coaches might struggle to engage players. We completely understand that it’s easier to motivate when you have rewards like playing time and wins and losses to hang over players’ heads. But how do you motivate when your next game isn’t for six months?

Well, this article on MaxPreps shares some keys to keeping players engaged throughout the offseason. We picked out two that we particularly like:

  • Develop personal relationships
    The first key to getting more buy-in from your players is developing personal relationships. This is where it really starts. If you want your players to play hard, they have to know who you are, and you’ve got to know who they are.

We hear that from coaches a lot, and it’s so important in the offseason when attendance is — let’s say, more flexible — than in-season. Another piece of advice we hear a lot: Appeal to a player’s competitive spirit.

  • Create teams
    Create teams within your team to get more buy in from them during the off season. Divide all your kids. Divide them by five, six, eight different teams where they can compete for points. This will get them to buy into what you’re trying to do with your team.

Coaches — How do you keep your players engaged during the offseason?

2. How Cody Kennedy pestered his way into a coaching job, and later arrived at Tulane (Nola.com)

This is a great story about persistence for young coaches. If you want a job bad enough, do anything to get it. Tulane offensive line coach graduated from Southeastern Louisiana all the way back in 2012 and started blitzing the Tulane staff with emails every day in hopes of landing a job.

Cody Kennedy, who Tulane hired last month to coach the offensive line, had just finished playing four seasons at Southeastern Louisiana when he began sending those emails. This was in 2012. He sent those emails every day. Many times, he received zero replies.

Sure, the Tulane staff didn’t initially jump at the opportunity to hire Kennedy, but when they got caught in a bind with a vacancy at the position, they thought of the persistent job applicant.

That left him without another option. The two other people Hall interviewed for the position had since accepted other coaching chances. So that’s when Hall turned to offensive line coach Sam Gregg and said, “What about this dude that keeps emailing us. That guy has got to have something to him.”

What are you willing to do to land your dream coaching job?

3. Michigan state champion Chippewa Valley shares its secret to success (FNF Coaches)

The Chippewa Valley (Mich.) coaching staff recently shared its story with FNF Coaches about how the MaxOne mobile app helped their team win a state championship by organizing the strength training program.

The MaxOne mobile app was with athletes on their phones and encouraged them to hold themselves accountable as they worked their way through the program. This gave coaches a line of sight into who was working the hardest and who improved the most. Additionally, MaxOne enabled Coach Wilson to offer a “Feast of Champions” for the leaderboard leaders, which made athletes dig a little deeper.

MaxOne not only helped CVHS excel on the field, it helped the players excel in the classroom as well by freeing up time that would have otherwise been spent in the weight room.

Once CVHS switched over to MaxOne the change was apparent the first day, athletes couldn’t lose printouts and completed their workouts in 8-10 minutes less time (25 percent time savings), meaning students could get their school work completed sooner or get to work studying playbooks. MaxOne resulted in cost and time-savings wins that not even coach Wilson expected.

How have you organized your strength program to maximize efficiency?

What’s driving the conversation in your locker room? Email Managing Editor Dan Guttenplan or Tweet us @fnfcoaches. Don’t forget to use that hashtag #FNFCoachesTalk!

 

 

 

 

About the author

Dan Guttenplan