ASU is using Catapult GPS technology to monitor how much energy players exert during practices and games.

Dartmouth College Engineering graduate Quinn Connell, upper left, controls the movement of the team's “Mobile Virtual Player” during college football practice Wednesday Aug. 26, 2015, in Hanover, N.H.  In an effort to avoid concussions, the team practices with its new “Mobile Virtual Player,” which the school says is the only powered device that simulates a real football player in size, weight, agility and speed. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Dartmouth College Engineering graduate Quinn Connell, upper left, controls the movement of the team’s “Mobile Virtual Player” during college football practice Wednesday Aug. 26, 2015, in Hanover, N.H. In an effort to avoid concussions, the team practices with its new “Mobile Virtual Player,” which the school says is the only powered device that simulates a real football player in size, weight, agility and speed. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Source: AZCentral.com

Coaches who are interested in monitoring an individual player’s energy level can look to the Arizona State football team for direction.

For the first time, ASU this season is using Catapult GPS technology to monitor how much energy players exert during practices and games. How it works: Each day, 23 players have a device about the size of a flip phone attached to the inside of their shoulder pads. Every movement is then recorded during the course of a practice or game, giving strength coaches a detailed look at the team’s energy level.

“It has really helped tremendously,” said coach Todd Graham, adding that the steps taken today probably will help the Sun Devils more later in the season when there’s possibly more at stake. “It helps you in how you’re training to know what needs to be adjusted. It helps us keep guys fresh and with the recovery process.”

For more on this story, visit: http://www.azcentral.com/story/sports/ncaaf/asu/2016/09/13/asu-football-gps-technology/90331704/

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